EMPLOYEE TURNOVER – HOW MUCH IS IT COSTING YOU?

Employee Turnover in staff personnel can be defined in different ways depending on who specifically is talking about the employment issue. Let’s look at just three of the many ways to define this costly hiring issue within organizations.

Required Employee Turnover in a department

Employee Turnover definitionFor some hiring managers employee turnover is exactly what the department or company needs to get a fresh start or new blood in the organization. The organization has hired poorly in recent years and non- producing staff members are content to bide their time in non-productivity and happily collect their weekly pay cheque.

On the other hand, the organization has hired very efficiently in the past but the market has shifted and now the once well-equipped and productive staff are over their heads in a new technology based environment where they are simply lost, have had no training (and will not receive any in the near future) or they do not have the initiative to learn and grow in the new world they now face. Sometimes, in this environment, employee turnover has to happen to allow new, more productive employees to take hold of the company reigns and move the business forward.

Cultural Fit Employee Turnover

…. Read More at Hiring Simulation: What is Employee Turnover?

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We all subscribe to the adage that it is cheaper to keep a current customer than to acquire a new one. The same premise applies to employees.

Recruiting new staff is a time consuming and expensive exercise that directly affects your bottom line. Many organizations are unaware of the actual costs of employee turnover or why good employees leave.

Studies have shown that it can cost up to 18 months’ salary to lose and replace a manager or professional and up to six months’ salary to lose and replace an hourly worker. If you think these numbers sound high, consider all the different costs that are involved:

  • Administrative expenses related to the exit of an employee and entry of a new hire
  • Advertising expense
  • Management time involved in reviewing applications, interviewing candidates and conducting reference checks
  • Potential overtime costs for other staff while the position is vacant
  • Time and resources spent for orientation and training of the new employee
  • Supervisory disruption in orienting and training the new employee
  • Loss of productivity while the employee is on the learning curve
  • Errors that occur while the employee is learning

With the highest turnover rates in Canada in retail trade, hotels, restaurants and leisure, reducing turnover is a particularly relevant topic. Given the expense, it makes sense to understand why good employees are leaving and what can be done to keep them.

While pay and working hours are certainly important factors, studies in the hospitality industry also point to several other key reasons for leaving. These include:

  • Lack of recognition for good work from management/supervisors
  • Lack of opportunities for advancement
  • Lack of opportunities for training and to learn new skills
  • Inability to use skills and abilities

Employees of Canadian small businesses have reported that the following changes in management and supervisory behavior would influence their decision to stay or leave a job:

  • Give more recognition for a job well done
  • Give employees more constructive feedback
  • Share information with employees
  • Clearly communicate the work to be done
  • Give feedback on a regular basis
  • Make sure employees have the training they need to do their work
  • Plan work effectively
  • Ask employees for input before making decisions that affect their work

It’s interesting to note that most of these changes cost nothing to implement and the impact can be significant. For example, a large hotel chain calculated that a 10% decrease in annual employee turnover led to a 1-3% decrease in lost customers. That translated to a $50-$100 million increase in annual revenues.

The numbers in your business may not be of that magnitude but the concept is the same—employee turnover costs—and some of the solutions don’t require cash outlays.

The Keys to Hire Better, High Producing Sales People

hire better

The Keys to Hire Better, High Producing Sales People

There is typically little relationship between a candidate’s performance in the interview and their execution in the key activities of the position.  In fact, the use of job simulations has proven that the traditional interview process can not predict a candidate’s ability to execute key success functions of the job.

 

Read more at: Hire Better, High Producing Sales People

Hire Better, High Producing Sales Professionals

Hire Better, High Producing Sales Professionals

Hiring Sales people who will produce the expectations is a difficult challenge for most organizations.  Making hiring mistakes is costly – both in direct as well as opportunity costs.

Traditional hiring practices are a significant part of the problem.  A recent survey of business owners and executives indicated that over 90% either disliked the hiring process or felt they were ill equipped to hire better and more effectively.

 

Source: http://hireresults.ca/hire-better-sales-professionals/